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GIA Knowledge Session-A Glimmer of Hope: A Look at the World’s Most Famous Blue Diamond (Nov 18)

AS
Alex Speer
Tue, Nov 16, 2021 1:53 PM

[cid:image001.jpg@01D7DAC7.6FBCA4E0]  Hear from GIA researchers on the latest topics:

A Glimmer of Hope: A Look at the World’s Most Famous Blue Diamond

Thursday, November 18 at 10:00 a.m. PDT

Registerhttps://discover.gia.edu/webinar-glimmer-hope.html

The Hope diamond is perhaps the most famous jewel in the world. In addition to its illustrious royal provenance, it is a rare marvel of nature due to its size, blue color and red phosphorescence. Follow Senior Manager of Diamond Identification Dr. Sally Magaña as she delves through both the history and recent scientific discoveries surrounding this gem.

Speaker

[cid:image002.jpg@01D7DAC7.6FBCA4E0]

Dr. Sally Magaña received her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. She is based at GIA in Carlsbad, California, where she currently serves as the Sr. Manager of Diamond Identification.

[cid:image003.jpg@01D7DAC7.6FBCA4E0]

Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) analyses of the Hope diamond gave spot total boron concentrations as high as 8.4 ± 1.1 ppm.  (a) The 45.52 ct Hope diamond from the Smithsonian Institution removed from its necklace setting. (b) The Hope diamond under the ion guns of the ToF-SIMS.  The analyses were performed on its culet facet; for scale, the thickness of the Hope diamond is 1.2 cm (Gaillou et al. (2012) Boron in natural type IIb blue diamonds: Chemical and spectroscopic measurements. American Mineralogist, Volume 97, 1–18).

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Recorded past GIA Knowledge Sessionshttps://www.gia.edu/knowledge-sessions-webinar

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[cid:image001.jpg@01D7DAC7.6FBCA4E0] Hear from GIA researchers on the latest topics: A Glimmer of Hope: A Look at the World’s Most Famous Blue Diamond Thursday, November 18 at 10:00 a.m. PDT Register<https://discover.gia.edu/webinar-glimmer-hope.html> The Hope diamond is perhaps the most famous jewel in the world. In addition to its illustrious royal provenance, it is a rare marvel of nature due to its size, blue color and red phosphorescence. Follow Senior Manager of Diamond Identification Dr. Sally Magaña as she delves through both the history and recent scientific discoveries surrounding this gem. Speaker [cid:image002.jpg@01D7DAC7.6FBCA4E0] Dr. Sally Magaña received her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. She is based at GIA in Carlsbad, California, where she currently serves as the Sr. Manager of Diamond Identification. [cid:image003.jpg@01D7DAC7.6FBCA4E0] Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) analyses of the Hope diamond gave spot total boron concentrations as high as 8.4 ± 1.1 ppm. (a) The 45.52 ct Hope diamond from the Smithsonian Institution removed from its necklace setting. (b) The Hope diamond under the ion guns of the ToF-SIMS. The analyses were performed on its culet facet; for scale, the thickness of the Hope diamond is 1.2 cm (Gaillou et al. (2012) Boron in natural type IIb blue diamonds: Chemical and spectroscopic measurements. American Mineralogist, Volume 97, 1–18). ======================= Recorded past GIA Knowledge Sessions<https://www.gia.edu/knowledge-sessions-webinar> =====================